The Real March Madness – Spring has Sprung on Tree Campus USA Campuses Across the East Region

Of the 68 National Collegiate Athletic Association teams playing in this year’s tournament, we found 29 colleges that have been recognized as 2013 Tree Campus USA campuses. Our NCAA series concludes with our final region of Tree Campus USA campuses — the east region.

americanAmerican University: American University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for five years. AU’s campus arboretum offers more than 75 different tree species.

Delaware State University: delawareDelaware State University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years. DSU’s campus arboretum contains more than 174 different species and some notable trees, including the Shingle Oak state record tree, the 2nd largest of its species in the state.

dukeDuke University: Duke University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for six years. Duke has taken a number of initiatives toward becoming a more sustainable campus. In addition to campus efforts, Duke collaborated with NC State University and the NC Division of Forest Resources to achieve sustainable forestry certificates for 55,000 acres of forest in North Carolina.

SyracuseSyracuse University: Syracuse University has been designated a Tree Campus USA for two years. SU’s grounds department maintains more than 683 acres of landscape.

University of Connecticut: UConnUniversity of Connecticut received Tree Campus USA designation for the first time in 2013.  More than 300 tree species are spread across 4,104 acres on the UConn main campus.

University of Florida: HSC-aerial[1]University of Florida received Tree Campus USA designation for the first time in 2013. The campus is adorned with more than 1,200 trees. UF’s efforts on becoming more sustainable have made them an Audubon International Cooperative Sanctuary.

University of Massachusetts Lowell: Southwick620[1]University of Massachusetts Lowell has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years.

Is your school or alma mater a Tree Campus USA? Learn more about the Benefits of Being a Tree Campus USA.

The Real March Madness – Spring has Sprung on Tree Campus USA Campuses Across the Central Region

Of the 68 National Collegiate Athletic Association teams playing in this year’s tournament, we found 29 colleges that have been recognized as 2013 Tree Campus USA’s. Our NCAA series continues with the following list of Tree Campus USA’s in the central region.

Photo Services, Kim HaskinsUniversity of Michigan: U-M was the first university to be recognized as a Tree Campus USA and has received designation for the last six years. U-M has more than 16,000 trees spread across its four campuses. The central campus alone has more than 1,200 trees.

eku2_4[1]Eastern Kentucky: EKU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years.

Tennessee State University: aerial[1]TSU received recognition as a Tree Campus USA for the first time in 2013. TSU is moving to become a greener campus through its campus sustainability initiative, including a thermostat setback policy and use of green cleaning chemicals.

Tohio-state-university[1]he Ohio State University: OSU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years. OSU’s extension is continually working to raise awareness of the social and economic benefits trees provide through its ‘Why Trees Matter’ program.

University of Iowa: UI has been designated a Tree Campus USA for five years. The University of Iowa Campus looking west from Old Capitol and the Pentacrest.UI has more than 7,700 trees on campus, and plants 300 news trees every year.

University of Louisiana Lafayette: UL Lafayette has been designated a Tree Campus USA for five years. The campus has implemented a number of green initiatives including Acorns of Hope, aLafayette,_Louisiana-Ullaf[1] joint project with local non-profit Bob’s Tree Preservation to reforest the eroding coastline of South Louisiana.

University of Louisville: University_of_Louisville,_Belknap_Campus,_from_Eastern_Parkway_overpass[1]The U of L has been designated a Tree Campus USA for four years. The campus has more than 2,500 trees and a number of programs in place to maintain its greenery.

The Real March Madness – Spring has Sprung on Tree Campus USA Campuses Across the Great Plains

Of the 68 National Collegiate Athletic Association teams playing in this year’s tournament, we found 29 colleges that have been recognized as 2013 Tree Campus USA’s. Our NCAA series continues with the following list of Tree Campus USA’s in the Great Plains region.

Creighton_mall_west[1]Creighton University: Creighton has been designated a Tree Campus USA for six years. Creighton was also recognized in The Princeton Review’s Guide to 322 Green Colleges, the only Nebraska college to earn such recognition.

Kansas State University: KSU received recognition ANDERSON[1]as a Tree Campus USA for the first time in 2013. KSU’s campus is also an arboretum and offers visitors self-guided tree tours.

North Dakota State University: NDSU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years. The campus arboretum crew at NDSU plants 50-75 trees every year.NDSU

Oklahoma State University: OSU-Library[1]OSU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years.

SLUSaint Louis University: SLU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for two years. The university has also been named a ‘Cool School’ by the Sierra Club for its commitment to sustainability.

KUUniversity of Kansas: KU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for two years.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: UNL has been designated a unlTree Campus USA for six years. The campus landscape services maintain more than 9,000 trees across the two campuses. The landscape is valued at more than $9.1 million.

The Real March Madness – Spring has Sprung on Tree Campus USA Campuses Across the West

When folks think of a quality institution of higher learning, they often think of academics, athletics, and the quality of life on campus, which includes its natural beauty, of which trees play a major part. Of the 68 National Collegiate Athletic Association teams playing in this year’s tournament, we found 29 colleges that have been recognized as 2013 Tree Campus USA’s. Our NCAA series will highlight the 2013 recognized Tree Campus USA schools as divided by region. Below is our first list of NCAA Tree Campus USA teams in the West Region.

igwKFmtSCJdY[1]Arizona State University: ASU has been recognized as a Tree Campus USA for six years. ASU’s Tempe campus encompasses Arizona’s largest public arboretum with more than 900 species and is nationally recognized. It’s also the oldest continually managed green space in Arizona.

campus[1]University of Arizona: The UA has been recognized as a Tree Campus USA for five years. In addition, UA received a gold rating for sustainability in 2012 by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE).

Stanford University: Stanford is new to the Tree Campus USA community, gaining recognition for the first time in 2013. location[1]The campus also recognizes ‘significant trees’ — trees selected as outstanding and deserving of special protection because of their rarity, age, or historical importance.

University of Colorado- Boulder: CU has been recognized as a Tree Campus USA for four years. campusphoto[1]CU isn’t only working to make their campus greener, but their stadiums too. Ralphie’s Green Stampede is a campus initiative to move toward a zero-waste football stadium, converting virtually all public food and beverage packaging to recyclable or compostable materials and containers.

Texas Southern University: TSU has been a designated Tree Campus USA for three years.TSU_SB[1]

University of Texas Austin: UT has been designated a Tree Campus USA for 6 years, University of Texas Austin campus at sunset-dusk - aerial viewand is one of the first three campuses in the nation to become a Tree Campus USA. UT’s trees are estimated to be valued at $25 million.

Weber State University: 8421682_orig[1]WSU has been designated a Tree Campus USA for three years. WSU has also been listed in The Princeton Review’s Guide to 322 Green Colleges: 2013 Edition for demonstrating notable commitments to sustainability in academic offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation.

MLB Community Forestry Match Up: Cactus League v. Grapefruit League

cactus_st_logo[1] For baseball enthusiasts, it may not feel like spring until Major League Baseball spring training begins. With a few days left until opening day, we thought it appropriate to hold a match-up of our own in comparing a few of the host cities’ community forestry accomplishments.

Phoenix

PhoenixPhoenix has more to offer than year-long sunshine and desert. This city of one million residents is adorned with more than 92,000 trees throughout the greater Phoenix area.  These trees have benefited the city in several ways. Property value in Phoenix has increased by more than $3 million as a result of the benefits trees provide. With an annual average of more than 200 days of sunshine, it’s a good idea that the city would plant trees to help provide shade on hot days and cool things off a bit. In fact, the city’s tree canopy saves $1.1 million annually in energy costs as result of the cooling that city trees provide. Not a bad deal for living in the desert. In fact, in 2009 Phoenix set a goal to increase its tree canopy coverage from 8% to 25% by the year 2030.  In addition, Phoenix has been designated a Tree City USA community for 28 years, and Growth Award recipient 18 years.

Glendale

glendaleGlendale, a growing city of more than 220,000 residents, is home to major sports venues including the University of Phoenix Stadium. Glendale boasts more than 21,000 trees that offer visitors plenty of shade under which to cool off. In fact, the city’s tree canopy helps lower energy cost by more than $116,000 a year.  Glendale’s property value has increased by nearly $500,000 as a result of the tree landscape, something residents are sure to appreciate. In addition, Glendale has been designated a Tree City USA community for 18 years.

Tampa

tampaTampa, home to more than 300,000 people, features a wonder of natural sights and attractions. Among things to enjoy in the area are some of the city’s 7.8 million trees. The trees throughout the city provide approximately $3.9 million in energy savings annually. Tampa’s tree canopy coverage is at an impressive 28%. Tampa has been recognized as a Tree City USA community for 32 years.

 

Orlando

LakeEolaOrlando504044[1]Orlando, a city of a quarter of a million people and the theme park capital of the United States, provides plenty of greenery to enjoy in between thrilling rides. Whether you’re a city slicker or tree hugger, Orlando’s 88,000 trees are something that any local or visitor can appreciate. The city launched Green Works Orlando in 2007— a plan to improve environmental sustainability in Orlando during the next generation. Since its launch, the city has saved more than $1million annually in energy costs. Orlando has a tree canopy coverage of 26%. In addition, Orlando has been designated a Tree City USA community for 37 years and Growth Award recipient for23 years.

Community forestry programs are an asset to cities, communities, and neighborhoods, contributing to their environmental and economic well-being. The benefits made possible by a healthy, vibrant community tree canopy are enjoyed by the current and future generations.

Which Cactus League or Grapefruit League city do you think earns the title in our MLB Community Forestry Match Up?


 

California Celebrates Arbor Week in March

arbor-logo-lg[1]While the National Arbor Day observance is celebrated on the last Friday in April, many states have implemented state-recognized Arbor Days that reflect the best time for planting in their region.

California doesn’t only celebrate Arbor Day; the state has a whole week dedicated to educating Californians on the value trees provide to healthy cities. In 2011 the California State Assembly and Senate approved Resolution ACR 10, a measure that recognized how vital trees are to the state, and declaring the establishment of Arbor Week. Arbor Week—celebrated March 7 to March 14—encourages residents to observe the week with tree planting activities and programs.

One of the various benefits of the state celebrating Arbor Week is that it allows like-minded organizations the opportunity to work together and organize events on a larger scale.  California is home to 143 certified Tree City USA communities, 10 Tree Line USA Utilities, and four Tree Campus USA’s. We wish we could recognize each celebration. Below are highlights of a few of the Arbor Day events that took place last year.kids

Sacramento, designated a Tree City USA for 37 years and Growth Award recipient 10 years, was listed as one of the 10 Best Cities for Urban Forests.  The city launched a 30K Tree campaign in 2012—an effort to plant 30,000 trees in one year throughout the Sacramento region. During a 20-year period, 30,000 trees could collect 8.5 million tons of carbon, capture 11 million gallons of storm water, and remove 110,000 pounds of pollutants from the air.

To kick off Arbor Week and celebrate the completion of the 30K campaign, the Sacramento Tree Foundation and Joint Venture joined the mayor in a ceremonial tree planting at Pacific Elementary School. Later in the week locals were invited to McKinley Park for a community picnic. The celebration included tree tours, a chance to make ‘I Love Trees’ buttons, bead bracelet making, and music.

Ssan jose cali releafan Jose—a Tree City USA for 31 years—worked with local non-profit California ReLeaf to plant trees in schools and neighborhoods across the city. Additionally, seniors and disabled residents were given trees to plant in their yards and park strips and had help planting them from Our City Forest—a local non-profit involved in engaging the community in the maintenance of the urban ecosystem.

Cupertino held a combined Earth Day/Arbor Day festival that included 100 partners comprised of nonprofit organizations and businesses. Booths offered tips, demonstrations, and activities centered on creating a sustainable lifestyle. It was estimated that 5,000 to 7,500 community members attended the event.

Can you imagine your city without trees? Neither can we! How are you involved in maintaining your community’s tree canopy?

The Academy Awards—Trees in Film Part II

This weekend Hollywood will honor the achievements of actors, directors, and many others involved in creating motion pictures. Last week we posted The Academy Awards—Trees in Film and asked what other movies you could think of with memorable trees. We have our follow-up list inspired from your comments just in time for the awards.

To Kill a Mockingbird

mockThe emotional drama won three Oscars out of its eight nominations. Based on the 1961 novel by Harper Lee, the film tells the story of a lawyer living in an Alabama town in the 1930s who agrees to defend a young black man accused of raping a white woman. Depicted in the film is an Oak tree that two of the story’s characters, Jem and Scout, continually visit to find hidden treasures.

It’s a Wonderful Life

115862545.jpgNominated for six Oscars, this 1946 comedy-drama invites viewers on a journey with George Bailey, a distraught man on the verge of suicide who’s dedicated his whole life to Bedford Falls, his home.  Just as he’s ready to take his life an angel appears, ready to help George through his trialing time. A key scene in the movie shows George crashing his car into a tree during a snow storm.

Forest Gump

b5cc94eef5585b072cf53469[1]Having taken home six Oscars, Forrest Gump tells the story of a mentally challenged man’s journey through life. As fate would have it, Forrest is a part of important historical events and meets public figures, however that doesn’t faze Forrest because the only thing on his mind is his childhood sweetheart, Jenny Curran. Viewers grow up with Forrest as the film progresses, but one thing that stays constant in his life is the tree to which Forrest and Jenny continually return. The Southern Oak tree in the film is located in South Carolina and has served as a tourist attraction for fans.

 

 

New Mexico Celebrates Arbor Day in March

ArborWhile the National Arbor Day observance is celebrated on the last Friday in April, many states have implemented state-recognized Arbor Days that reflect the best time for planting in their region.

New Mexico celebrates Arbor Day the second Friday of March. Home to 12 certified Tree City USA communities, we take a look back at how a few of those cities observed the tradition.

Albuquerque—a Tree City USA community for 15 years—celebrated Arbor Day with a traditional tree planting. The city of Albuquerque Parks and Recreation partnered up with Albuquerque Public Schools, New Mexico State Urban Forestry, Kellyphoto3[1]and New Mexico Think Trees to plant trees at two local parks near schools. Students experienced hands-on participation in the tree plantings.

In addition to the city’s celebration, Tree New Mexico held a presentation at a Bernalillo County Open Space lead by certified arborists who talked about best practices in caring for trees. A local forester discussed the condition of New Mexico’s forests in light of changing climate and drought conditions. Participants received a New Mexico Olive Tree at the conclusion of the presentation.

The City of Santa Fe and Railyard Stewards—a local conservation organization that helps the city maintain its largest park—held a tree planting ceremony following the ribbon cutting and community picnic for the opening of the Los Pinos Bridge/Ashbaugh Park. Santa Fe has been designated a Tree City USA community for five years, and Growth Award recipient for two years.

In addition to the tree planting, the city gave away tree saplings and held family-friendly activities consisting of live music from a marimba band, ice cream, and pastries. The Santa Fe Disc Golf group held demonstrations and offered free classes to attendees.

c2bf20bcc12e505eb082fbf0fc83b62c[1]Roswell celebrated Arbor Day at the Spring River Park & Zoo with a tree planting and tree giveaway. A tree was planted in honor of PGA professional Saul Sanchez who was shot and killed after interrupting a burglary.

Following the tree planting city park staff gave demonstrations on proper tree pruning and climbing. Those who attended the Arbor Day celebration not only got to select two trees to take home with them but also had the opportunity to pose for pictures with Smokey Bear. Roswell, the state’s longest recognized Tree City USA has received the designation for 24 years and the Growth Award for 11.

Tennessee and North Carolina Celebrate Arbor Day in March

Arbor While the National Arbor Day observance is celebrated on the last Friday in April, many states have implemented state-recognized Arbor Days that reflect the best time for planting in their region.

Tennessee and North Carolina share more than just a border, they both celebrate Arbor Day the first Friday of March. We take a look back at how some of their Tree City USA communities have observed the tradition.

North Carolina

Charlotte—A recognized Tree City USA community for 34 years—observed Arbor Day with city officials planting two oak trees in a local park in honor of the retiring president of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Housing Partnership.

Greensboro—A recognized Tree City USA community for 23 years and Growth Award recipient for eight years—observed Arbor Day with a tree planting commemorating the 45th anniversary of Greensboro Beautiful. arbor20day.jpgGreensboro Beautiful is a nonprofit volunteer organization with the mission to conserve and enhance the beauty and ecology of the Greensboro community through public and private cooperation.

More than 150 volunteers gathered to plant 45 trees across various parts of downtown Greensboro. Each tree was tagged to show the positive financial impact it has on the environment duing the next 15 years.

Tennessee

Nashville—A recognized Tree City USA community for 18 years—commemorated Arbor Day with a memorial tree dedication in honor of four city officials. The city also acknowledged National Electric Service for its fifth year of being designated as a Tree Line USA utility company.nashville

Knoxville—A recognized Tree City USA community for 23 years and Growth Award recipient for five years—was granted the opportunity to host the state’s official Arbor Day celebration last year because its tree board was recognized as the state’s Tree Board of the Year in 2012. The celebration included an Arbor Day skit performed by local students.

Knoxville earned the state award for its work in completing the city’s first tree inventory and management plan for public property. The city plants about 350 new trees every year in addition to the thousands it currently manages.

If you’re interested in catching a glimpse of either state’s tree canopy, you might consider hiking the Appalachian Trail, where several miles of terrain fall along the North Carolina-Tennessee Border. Visitors can take in the miles of Oaks, Maples, and Firs that adorn the region.

The Academy Awards—Trees in Film

Hollywood is only a few weeks away from celebrating one of the largest red carpet events of the year—the Academy Awards. The annual award ceremony will honor the achievements of actors, directors, and many others involved in creating motion pictures. With the faces of Hollywood being recognized for some of their best work, we deemed it appropriate to shine light on the supporting roles trees have played in film. Although trees may not have played a prominent role in any of the 2014 Oscar nominated films, they have appeared in scenes from a number of renowned movies. The following list notes five Oscar-nominated movies that made these trees memorable.

The Wizard of Oz

trees-wizardofoz-590x350[1]Nominated for six Academy Awards, the Wizard of Oz tells the story of Dorothy, a Kansas girl who searches her way back home after her house is uprooted by a tornado. The most notable characters Dorothy encounters on her journey are a Scarecrow, Tin Man, and a Lion. In following the yellow brick road with her new-found friends, Dorothy comes across an apple tree from which she tries to pick an apple. The tree grabs the apple and slaps her hand. “How would you like to have someone come along and pick something off of you?” asks the apple tree.  Needless to say, Dorothy didn’t eat any apples off of that apple tree.

Gone with the Wind

This American classic— adapted from ADG GWTW 087-1[1]Margaret Mitchell’s novel—received 10 Oscars out of its 13 nominations. The film features the Wilkes’ family Twelve Oaks plantation situated in Georgia. The family’s white mansion is surrounded by twelve great oak trees in a near perfect circle. Historians say the fictional estate was inspired by the real-life Boone Hall plantation near Charleston, South Carolina. Boone Hall is one of the nation’s oldest working plantations and boasts the “Avenue of Oaks,” a mile long road lined with 350 year old Oak trees.

Hook

hookNominated for five Academy Awards, Hook is the continuation of an adult Peter Pan. The Hangman tree is an old tree with several hidden entrances that the Lost Boys used as a hideout. The name comes from its rope-like limbs that resemble nooses when hung low.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

whomping_willow_1[1]The first installment in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was nominated for three Oscars. The Whomping Willow tree in the film has a persona of its own. Situated on Hogwarts Grounds, it’s known for its violent behavior and attacks anyone who comes close to its branches. The tree was planted to guard the entrance of a secret tunnel. We get our initial introduction of the Whomping Willow’s temper when Harry and Ron accidentally crash their flying car into the tree, and the tree defends itself, critically damaging the car. In the Harry Potter sequel the Whomping Willow is shown destroying Harry’s broom when it falls into the tree’s branches.

Shawshank Redemption

shawshank-tree[1]Nominated for seven Oscars, this prison drama tells the story of two inmates who become friends while serving life sentences. Andy, who proclaimed his innocence since before his conviction, eventually escapes Shawshank State Prison, but before he flees he gives his new-found friend Red instructions to visit a specific hayfield in a nearby town, should Red ever be freed. 40 years later, Red is let out on parole and visits the hayfield to retrieve the package from Andy. The package is hidden in a rock wall beneath an Oak tree. The Oak tree portrayed at the end of the movie is located in Mansfield, Ohio and fans journey from all parts of the world to see it.

What movies can you think of with memorable appearances by trees?