Member Note of Gratitude, the Majestic Crapemyrtle

image 1 CMGreat story from one of our members who joined several years ago and out of the blue, followed up with a generous donation.

“We write to you in appreciation and in awe of what our contribution several years ago has accomplished, and what we hope will inspire others to follow suit and contribute to the Arbor Day Foundation. Here is our endowment of gratitude for the beauty that has resulted from that small investment.image 2 CM

About 6-8 years ago we saw an advertisement to contribute $10 to the Arbor Day Foundation and receive several trees as a gift. We’re concerned about the deforestation of our planet, so we sent a contribution not expecting much; In exchange we received five young trees. With good humor we planted them. They grew and grew, and grew; four years later, the results are majestic: five magnificent 12-foot tall crapemyrtles now grace our steep mountainside yard.

Thank you so much for all you’re doing for our planet. We are in desperate shape and need lots of help!”

  Image 3 CM

 

Street Trees Boost Home Sales Price

Earlier this month, The Wall Street Journal wrote about the value of street trees — those planted between the sidewalk and the road — in increasing the sales price of a home.

houses prop valueIn the study featured — “Trees in the city: Valuing street trees in Portland, Ore.” — 2,608 single family home sales in Portland, Oregon, from July 1, 2006 to April 26, 2007 were analyzed.

Key findings from the research:

  • Homes with street trees sold for $7,130 more, on average, and 1.7 days more quickly
  • Neighboring houses within 100 feet of street trees sold for $1,688 more each, on average
  • The sale premium of having street trees was the same as adding 129 square feet of finished space

 

Tree Campus USA Event Helps Replant Tree Canopy Lost to Asian Longhorn Beetle

tree-campus-usaThe Tree Campus USA program will be sponsoring a tree-planting event, Tuesday, Oct. 22, in Worcester, Massachusetts, where Worcester State University, Becker College and College of the Holy Cross will be receiving Tree Campus USA recognition. Volunteers from the colleges and surrounding community will also be planting 41 trees to help the Worcester Tree Initiative in their goal to plant 30,000 trees by 2014.

“We are excited about this Tree Campus USA project because it brings all the universities together to work on the reforestation of Worcester. (The reforestation) is a big project and having the universities involved in a big part of that. They already do a lot around taking care of trees and it is important the community knows that.” – Peggy Middaugh, Director, Worcester Tree Initiative

This city-wide event will celebrate Worcester’s replanting efforts following an Asian Longhorn Beetle infestation that wiped out nearly all the city’s trees 10 years ago. There will also be an information fair before the event to educate the community on the benefits of trees, local tree-planting and sustainability initiatives.

The event is sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation, the Worcester Tree Initiative, GreenerU and the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.

“I think a lot of campuses are already doing a lot for tree planting and tree care and Tree Campus USA further incentivizes and formalizes that commitment to trees.” – Lea Lupkin, Sustainability Program Manager, GreenerU

Trees for Bees

Photo credit: Flickr, Emilian Robert Vicol

Photo credit: Flickr, Emilian Robert Vicol

You’ve probably heard more buzz about bees than usual lately—from unexplained deaths en masse to faltering fruit crops in their absence. One thing you’ve probably learned is that bees are important (if not essential) components to multitudes of ecosystems around the world: particularly ones that produce much of our food.

Why are bees so important?

When we think of bees, we typically think of their use in the production of honey and beeswax. Perhaps you’ve heard of the medicinal uses for bee venom—which has been used for treating arthritis, multiple sclerosis and even fibromyalgia, and more recently to treat cancer, epilepsy and depression.

While these are incredibly important functions, bees, and honeybees in particular, have a much more wide-reaching impact than many of us realize. “Typically, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, these under-appreciated workers pollinate 80 percent of our flowering crops which constitute 1/3 of everything we eat. Losing them could affect not only dietary staples such as apples, broccoli, strawberries, nuts, asparagus, blueberries and cucumbers, but may threaten our beef and dairy industries if alfalfa is not available for feed,” says Maria Boland, of Mother Nature Network. One Cornell University study estimated that honeybees annually pollinate $14 billion worth of seeds and crops in the U.S. The University of Arizona has determined more than 100 different agricultural crops in the U.S. are pollinated by bees.

While the root causes of the problem of the great bee disappearance are still being determined (experts suggest harmful pesticides or harmful pesticide exposure, viruses and poor nutrition play large roles, in addition to ever-decreasing habitat/food sources), the issue of what proactive measures to take remains. Outside of donning a beekeeper mask/gear and cultivating hives of one’s own (which is certainly an option, though it’s not for everyone), what can a person do to help these productive members of our planet?

Luckily, there are many things.

  • Avoid spraying plants in bloom and apply chemicals after bees have returned to their colonies at night. The best way to conserve pollinators, according to the Xerces Society, is to avoid pesticides altogether.
  • Where possible, plant or maintain regionally native plant species—in general, they are able to support a larger number of species than non-native plants and often have a higher habitat or food value…especially for bees. Some native bee species are “specialists” and forage only a few specific native plants. Also, single-flowered plants (which are closer to their natural form) are better for bees than double-or triple-flowered ornamental and fruit trees.
  • Provide nesting sites for our native bees in your landscape by leaving areas of your yard or garden undisturbed and uncultivated. These bees are solitary or nest in very small numbers with different nesting requirements from the large hives created by European honeybees.
  • Plant a mix of trees and shrubs that are rich sources of both nectar and pollen, as bees need both for proper nutrition. (Don’t have space for any more trees? Planting crocus, anise hyssop, bee balm and asters in your perennial garden can be of great service to bees, too).
  • When creating the plan for or adding to your garden/yard, use a diversity of plant species with a succession of blooms from early spring through fall…this provides foraging bees with steady sources of nutrition. Clumping plants of the same species into a small area attracts more bees than individual or widely scattered plants.

Bee-friendly spring blossoms:

(Very early bloom time): Maple, Willow, Elm, Hybrid Hazelnut, Almond, and Oak

(Early to later bloom time): Crabapple , Apple, Cherry, Plum (and most other fruit trees), Hickory, Redbud, Sassafras, Tupelo, and Native Mesquite

Bee-friendly summer blossoms:

(Very early bloom time): American Mountainash, Catalpa, Viburnum, Blackberry, Blueberry, Raspberry

(Early to later bloom time): Sourwood, Baswood, Littleleaf Linden, Elderberry, Rose and Native Mesquite (second bloom period)

Bee-friendly fall/winter blossoms:

Franklin Tree, California Laurel, Potentilla, Blue Mist Shrub, Bodnant Viburnum, Seven-Son Flower, Sunflower and Aster

What are you doing to help out our pollinator friends or what would you like to do? Leave your comments below.

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