The Most Important Tree Care Step: Right Tree, Right Place

A  few weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend the Partners in Community Forestry National Conference in Philadelphia.  The three day conference brought together a diverse group of individuals that all take care of or build urban forest.  Groups included utility arborists, city foresters, non-profit tree planting organizations, city planners, and city employees (just to name a few).  While sitting in one seminar about the 2030 Shade plan for the City of Phoenix the point came back to me again about how important Right Tree, Right Place is.  The city is making a huge investment to increase their urban canopy from under 10% to 25% by 2030.  

The plan focuses much of its effort on Right Tree Right Place because so much of their current effort and budget is currently about fixing trees because they were Wrong Tree, Wrong Place. Read more…

Conifer Winter Tree Care

Colorado Blue Spruce in Winter

Q: Robert, since winter is quickly approaching can you give readers any general advice about winter tree care focusing on caring for conifers in winter?

The main problem we hear about in winter seems to be bent or broken limbs or trunks on young conifers (pine, evergreens, spruces…).  Don’t give up on these young plants.  As soon as possible after snow or ice bends them down, use rope, strong cord or wire to secure them upright to stakes or sturdy parts of the tree.  Spring growth will usually provide the strength needed to maintain the upright position.  At some point during the first or second summer, you should be able to remove the support system. Read more…

Autumn Tree Care

Autumn Tree Care

Cooler weather is a great time for planting trees and for the trees that you currently it is time to prepare them for the rapidly approaching winter months.

Here are some tips from our friends at Casey Trees in Washington DC.

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Hickory, Chicory, Dock

Think for a moment about the origins of the various culinary and medicinal purposes to which plants have been put over the millennia. For every fruit, nut, leaf, berry, etc. that became food or medicine for us at some point in history or prehistory, somebody initially served as the “guinea pig.” That is, somebody in a particular tribe was the first to try ingesting taro root, for example (better known as elephant ears). Said guinea pig survived (in this case), and others followed suit. Through a less fortunate guinea pig, people learned that foxglove didn’t make for a very good snack! Read more…